The Dangers of Letting Corrosion Grow

There are many things in the environment that are corrosive, or capable of damaging and destroying metal. If left unaddressed, corrosion can eventually cause damage to humans, creating problems with the respiratory and digestive tracts, the skin, and the eyes. In the most severe situations, the effects of corrosion can be life-threatening.

Where Corrosion Like to Hide

Any material can have an adverse reaction to the environment around it. If this happens, deterioration occurs that can lead to corrosion. In many commercial settings, you will find damage to iron, steel, or metal, everywhere from warehouse tanks and cylinders, to pipework, rails, and bridges. Once corrosion begins, is it certain that structural failure is inevitable. Key risks with corrosion include:

  • Loss of equipment longevity
  • Increased risk of injury to employees or the general public
  • Reduced value for a building, location, or piece of equipment,
  • Pipe blockages leading to mechanical failure for pumps and valves
  • Increased potential for gas or chemical leaks
  • Potential contamination of liquids contained in corroded vessels or pipes

The Cost of Corrosion

Though many of the problems with corrosion affect the industrial sector, the heavy cost of corrosion is the impact it makes on human life. It endangers public safety and creates additional expenses for the costs to repair parking structures, bridges, and signs. Electrical towers are in jeopardy, as are traffic lights and street lighting. Corrosion costs the nation hundreds of billions of dollars.

The Fix for Corrosion

In addition to relying on stellite manufacturing to produce quality coatings for materials, more consistent use of thermal sprays can help reduce material degeneration. Many household items are already equipped with protective barriers, but technology can improve the delivery and quality of these protections.

Unless protective measures are taken, corrosion has the potential to wreak havoc on the nation’s infrastructure, industries, and public health.